Home Page of the DPNA Website Learn about the Drug Prevention Network of the Americas, its history, principles, members, supporters, and board Looking for information about drug prevention?  Check out our web page links, books, presentations, position papers, and brochures Want to connect with national, regional or international drug prevention sites?  Visit our extensive Links section. Keep up with the latest drug prevention news and events. Ready to become a part of the Drug Prevention Network of the Americas?  Sign up on line.

Drug Headlines across the U.S. for the week of October 1 Edition

Hello,

The Northeast Counterdrug Training Center (NCTC) will hold a Grant Writing class on October 24-28, 2005 at the Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Annville, Penn. The course is open to all Drug Demand Reduction programs including nonprofits, partnerships and coalitions. The course and housing and meals at the training center are offered at no cost to participants. Coalition participants from previous sessions have offered rave reviews of the course and its usefulness.

This practical grant writing course will provide participants with the fundamental skills needed to research, develop, write, and submit grant proposals. This course will cover grant development, creation of grant components, research and identification of funding sources, development of goals, objectives and evaluation plans.
To gain the maximum benefit from this course, all participants must come to the course with a project idea or a Request for Proposal from a funding source or funding announcement.
You may register for the course through the NCTC Web site, at
www.counterdrug.org.
For additional information, contact MSgt. Howard Soule, by e-mail at
c-hsoule@state.pa.us, or by telephone at 717-861-2329.

Have a great week!                                                                                                                                                                                  
Sharon                                                                                                                                                                                                           Sharon L. Smith
President-MOMSTELL
Box 450
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055
www.momstell.com
 

THE PATRIOT NEWS (PA)
WILL METH TAKE HOLD IN THE MIDSTATE?

With a telltale, noxious chemical stink, the illicit drug methamphetamine announced its arrival in New Cumberland last week. Borough Police Chief Oren "Bud" Kauffman was disappointed but far from surprised. "We know it's coming this way," Kauffman said after Wednesday's arrest of two men accused of trying to make the drug in a borough apartment building. "Had I hoped in my heart of hearts that it wouldn't? Of course."

Law enforcement officials rank meth as the No. 1 drug problem in the country. The addictive stimulant is dangerous to make but provides a euphoric high for hours. Already a scourge across middle America, its tendrils are snaking with some regularity into the midstate. It doesn't take long for meth to take hold.

It's said that every meth "cook" teaches another 10 users how to make the drug. Most make only enough for themselves and a few friends, making it far more difficult for law enforcement to infiltrate than typical drug hierarchies. Virtually everything needed to make the drug can be found at the store, under the kitchen sink or in the garage.

"I can make meth, or a meth cook can make meth, in a 2-foot-by-2-foot space," state police Cpl. Scott Heatley said. "It's scarily simple, which again adds to our problem."                                             http://www.pennlive.com/news/patriotnews/index.ssf?/base/news/1127640168319871.xml&coll=1

THE PATRIOT NEWS GOT A METH SCENE? CALL THE CLAN AB TEAM                                                                                 Whether cleaning up an illegal methamphetamine laboratory or containing an anthrax terror attack, they'll be the crew in the moon suits. First, the formal name: the Pennsylvania State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation Clandestine Laboratory/Weapons of Mass Destruction Response Team. The clan lab team, as members call it, was formed in 2001.

Sgt. Craig M. Summers, the team's current eastern section supervisor, said the team was the idea of a few state police officers who noticed the approaching meth scourge and decided that the state police needed a team of experts capable of defusing the dangers involved in meth production. Six full-time troopers, nine chemists and 36 part-timers make up the team. All are trained to handle the chemicals used to make meth and to decontaminate the potentially explosive environments found in homemade labs.

The chemists call the shots, determining what's inside a lab and how unstable the situation might be, Summers said. "They go right with us," Summers said. "We're going in there, really, helping them." Because of the training required, the team is equally adept at handling a biological or chemical weapons disaster.

"The bulk of our work is methamphetamine," Summers said. "We cover pretty much the whole state." http://www.pennlive.com/news/patriotnews/index.ssf?/base/news/1127640056319870.xml&coll=1

THE PATRIOT NEWS CV BOARD STANDS FIRM ON DRUG TESTING                                                                                            
Despite opposition from some parents, Cumberland Valley School Board has no plans to back away from its decision to conduct random drug testing of high school students this year. "The board stands firm," President Karen Christie said after a meeting last week at which a parent challenged the policy as violating students' privacy rights under state and federal constitutions.

Parent Kim Mayfath urged the board to make the policy voluntary so parents can "opt in or out." The policy the board approved in June allows random testing of all high school students who want to participate in extra- and co-curricular activities, including sports. The policy also covers students who want parking privileges to drive to school. The school district estimates the policy will cover nearly 90 percent of 2,560 students enrolled in grades nine through 12.

Other midstate school districts with random drug-testing policies include Lower Dauphin, Middletown, South Middleton, Upper Dauphin, Susquenita and Halifax. The policies vary in scope; South Middleton, for instance, tests only student athletes, while the Halifax policy is similar to Cumberland Valley's.

http://www.pennlive.com/news/patriotnews/index.ssf?/base/news/1127640119319870.xml&coll=1

LOS ANGELES TIMES  
METH MURDER VERDICT VOIDED
On appeal, the Riverside County conviction of a mother is blamed on judge's error
A state appeals court on Wednesday overturned the second-degree murder conviction of a Riverside County mother whose infant son died of a lethal dose of methamphetamine he may have ingested through her breast milk.The state's 4th District Court of Appeal also reversed three felony child endangerment convictions involving Amy Leanne Prien's treatment of her three surviving children and instructed the trial court to acquit Prien on those counts.
 
The court said such convictions meant there was actual harm to the children, whereas prosecutors argued only hypothetical harm. Riverside County Dist. Atty. Grover Trask said he was disappointed by the ruling but that he had the option to appeal to the state Supreme Court or retry Prien for murder.

Trask had decided on aggressive prosecution of Prien, whose case drew national attention, as a deterrent for other drug users. The prosecution was part of his larger effort to crack down on methamphetamine-related crime in the county, which has a reputation among law enforcement as the nation's "methamphetamine capital."

If Prien is retried on the murder count, prosecutors will have to prove there was implied malice, meaning that Prien knew her meth habit would cause her child's death and continued using the drug regardless, the appeals court said.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-methmom22sep22,1,257606.story?coll=la-headlines-california

THE OREGONIAN  
AS LAWS DRY UP HOME METH LABS, MEXICAN CARTELS FLOOD U.S. MARKET
As members of Congress consider restrictions on the sale of cold pills used to make methamphetamine, they might want to look at what's happened in Oklahoma, which has slashed the number of home meth labs yet failed to curb meth use. Oklahoma last year became the first state to make consumers visit a pharmacy counter to buy cold medicine containing the meth ingredient pseudoephedrine. Lab seizures plunged from 90 a month in 2003 to nine in June, state officials say. Fires and chemical hazards pose a smaller threat to neighborhoods and children of meth cooks.
 
But police say a massive influx of meth made by Mexican "superlabs," which can obtain tons of pseudoephedrine in Mexico, has kept meth plentiful and potent. The number of Oklahoma users shows no sign of falling, and property crime still keeps the Oklahoma County Jail at capacity.
 
"We took away their production," said Tom Cunningham, task force coordinator for the Oklahoma District Attorneys Council. "That didn't do anything for their addiction." Two decades of government effort have failed to curb the availability of meth. A new analysis of federal data by The Oregonian shows that the drug's potency has hit levels not seen in a decade. Rising purity indicates the supply of meth is growing, and it means a $25 bag of meth will last a user longer.
 
Congress is weighing competing proposals for how to respond.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/front_page/1127559319271250.xml&coll=7

CASPER STAR TRIBUNE (WY)  
JUDGE DROPS 'METH BABY' CHARGE
Ruling state law does not protect unborn children from drugs taken by expectant mothers, a judge dismissed a child endangerment case against a woman whose newborn child tested positive for methamphetamine.

In a written Sept. 20 decision, District Judge Norman Young said Michelle Ann Foust, 31, of Lander could not be charged with endangering her child by using meth during pregnancy because the state law does not apply to fetuses.
Foust could have been imprisoned for up to five years and fined up to $5,000 if she had been convicted under a new state law to punish women who endanger their children by taking drugs.

The law, which took effect July 2004, states: "No person shall knowingly and willingly cause or permit any child to absorb, inhale or otherwise ingest any amount of methamphetamine."
According to Lander police reports, Foust gave birth to a son on Oct. 31, 2004, at Lander Valley Medical Center, and police, responding to an anonymous tip that Foust had been using meth during her pregnancy, immediately tested her and her newborn son for the drug.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articles/2005/09/27/news/wyoming/76df395b95d0af
24872570880075b959.txt
 
 
ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
LEGISLATOR CLAIMS HE HAS IMMUNITY FROM DUI CHARGE
After Rep. David Graves was charged with drunken driving for a second time, he and his lawyer offered a surprising defense:
 
As a lawmaker, Graves cannot break the law at least not while the Legislature is at work.
 
The Macon Republican is using an obscure provision in the state constitution to argue that he should not be prosecuted for a DUI he received in Cobb County in February, during the 2005 session of the General Assembly.
 
The centuries-old provision holds that a lawmaker cannot be arrested during sessions of the General Assembly, legislative committee meetings or while they're "in transit," except in cases of "treason, felony, or breach of the peace." Such provisions were generally written to protect lawmakers from political intimidation.
 
Cobb State Court Judge Irma B. Glover is expected to make public her ruling today on Graves' "legislative immunity" defense. His trial is set for today.
 
Graves chairman of the House committee overseeing laws governing the alcohol industry has said that on Feb. 15, he and other committee chairmen went from the Capitol to a dinner meeting, where they conferred about the status of legislation and plans for the next legislative day. His lawyer, William C. "Bubba" Head, argues Graves should have been granted immunity from arrest because he was leaving a gathering that was tantamount to a committee meeting, according to legal filings.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/0905/27graves.html
 
BALTIMORE SUN  
CITY SEEKS EXPANDED ANTI-OVERDOSE TRAINING
The city Health Department is seeking funding to expand a program that distributes anti-overdose medication to heroin addicts by introducing training on how to use the medication at prisons and jails as well as to more sites around the city.

Since April 2004, the city has trained about 800 people, mostly addicts, in how to recognize heroin overdoses in others and administer the medication naloxone, an opiate antagonist used by emergency medical technicians to revive overdosed users. After completing the training session, the users are given several doses of the medication - which goes by the trade name Narcan - as well as syringes with which to inject it.

The program, called "Staying Alive" and funded by the Open Society Institute, drew scattered criticism when it began, but has since been credited with helping lower the rate of overdose deaths in the city. Last year, the city recorded 261 fatal overdoses, its lowest rate in five years. City health officials say graduates of the training program have reported more than 100 "saves" using Narcan and say they suspect there are other successful interventions they don't know about.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/health/bal-md.overdose27sep27,1,5967622,print.story
?coll=bal-local-headlines
 

BUCKS COUNTY COURIER ( PA)
BRADFORD COUNTY METH SITUATION PAINTS SCARY PICTURE                                                         
About 18 months ago, Phil Cusano was starting a community task force to combat his county's growing methamphetamine crisis. Cusano decided to start calling human services officials in counties throughout the state to see if they were interested in forming similar groups.

"Everybody said the same thing: 'We don't have a problem,' " said Cusano, director of Bradford County's drug and alcohol programs. "Well, now we say that if you don't think you have a meth problem, you just don't know about it."

Just three years ago, meth was seemingly nonexistent in Bradford County. Since then, the problem has erupted in this northeast Pennsylvania county of about 62,500, a population about 1/10th the size of Bucks, according to 2004 U.S. Census Bureau estimates.

Bradford County, which is about a four-hour drive from Lower Bucks, has seen the number of meth laboratories seized by police jump from six in 2003 to 20 in 2004 and 40 so far this year, according to state police. 
http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/111-09262005-546595.html

THE BOSTON GLOBE
A WARNING FLAG AGAINST LATEST FAD'HIGH' FOR TEENS
Abuse of Dust-Off can prove fatal, authorities say.  Generations of teenagers have sniffed common household products -- from glue to Whiteout to the propane in cigarette lighters -- for a cheap, easy route to intoxication. But the danger posed by the latest inhalant of choice, a common computer keyboard cleaner called ''Dust-Off," has prompted area police to warn parents and teens that the ''high" could be fatal.

Inhaling the compressed gas can cause brain damage and heart failure by robbing the lungs of oxygen, authorities say. In March, a 14-year-old boy from Ohio was found dead in his bed with a canister beside him. His death has received wide attention after his father, a police sergeant, posted a cautionary letter on the Internet that has caught the notice of police, educators, and parents.

Last summer, three California teenagers died in a car crash, and a can of Dust-Off was found inside the vehicle. In July, a teenager passed out in a West Hartford, Conn., drugstore after inhaling Dust-Off, then arose moments later to do it again, according to newspaper reports.In response, Falcon Safety Products, the maker of Dust-Off, released a statement citing the dangers of inhalant abuse and highlighting its efforts to combat the problem. Many stores, including Staples and Wal-Mart, have banned sales of the product to minors.

''One beer is not going to kill you under almost any circumstances, but with sniffing, you never know," said Patrolman Timothy O'Leary, the Foxborough Police Department's juvenile officer. 
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2005/09/25/a_warning_flag_against_latest_fad_high_for_teens/

THE NEW YORK TIMES
A SPORTS DRINK FOR CHILDREN IS JANGLING SOME NERVES                                                            

The company's marketing materials describe the drink as a way to kick-start the morning for children as young as 4. The company Web site, adorned with a picture of an elementary school wrestler and a gymnast, says its drink can help a child "develop fully as a high-performance athlete" and fill nutritional gaps "in a sport that is physically and mentally demanding."

The drink, called Spark, contains several stimulants and is sold in two formulations: one for children 4 to 11 years old that includes roughly the amount of caffeine found in a cup and a half of coffee, and one containing twice that amount for teenagers and adults. Despite the promotional materials, Sidney Stohs and Rick Loy, executives with AdvoCare International of Texas, which makes the products, said Spark was not devised or marketed for children's athletic performance but rather for their overall good health.

"It's not just a caffeine delivery system; it has many more nutritional properties," said Stohs, senior vice president for research and development at AdvoCare, the nation's leading company in direct marketing of dietary supplements for athletes. http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/25/sports/othersports/25drink.html?oref=login&oref=login

USA TODAY  
IN COLOMBIA, 'FORBIDDEN RHYTHMS' DEPICT COUNTRY'S VELVET UNDERWORLD
Singers decked out in glitzy Western suits sing of the lives and violent deaths of this country's drug kingpins, paying homage to some of the most infamous killers in a land scarred by bloodshed.
 
The country's "forbidden rhythms" music sometimes called "narco-rhythms" is a fast-growing genre that draws inspiration from the cocaine trade, a five-decade civil war and Colombia's high murder rate.
 
One popular tune is The Toad, slang for an informer. It's the musical lament of a drug lord who enjoys money, respect and women before he's ratted out and goes to jail. "Watch out, because when I get out, I'll be looking for you," singer Rey Fonseca croons.
http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20050926/a_colombiasongs26.art.htm 

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE                                                                                                                                       
ACLU WILL JOIN LAWSUIT OVER RAVE BUST IN UTAH COUNTY
                                                                        
The American Civil Liberties Union announced Monday that it would join in the lawsuit filed against the Utah County Sheriff by a Salt Lake City-based rave promoter whose party was busted on Aug. 20.     The ACLU's Margaret Plane said the sheriff's decision to raid the event with 90 officers, automatic weapons, dogs and a helicopter raises concerns about the First Amendment rights of those in attendance.

Law enforcement has singled out the often clandestine, DJ-driven dance parties as events with the singular intent of distributing and using illegal narcotics. Plane said that view is a generalization that is not fair to those who attend the shows with no intent of breaking the law.

"Raves are a legitimate form of artistic and cultural _expression," Plane said. "It looks like this is the targeting of a specific culture." 
"The association with raves and club drugs and the approach [the sheriff has taken] is tantamount to shutting down a Rolling Stones concert based on the fact that some concertgoers might be using illegal drugs," said Plane                                                       http://www.sltrib.com/utah/ci_3065481
 
PORTLAND OREGONIAN 
CHANGES ON TAP FOR MEDICAL MARIJUANA LAW
Oregon is on the verge of having its medical marijuana law revised to make it easier for police to interpret and harder for criminals to exploit.  
To date, more than 11,000 Oregonians have medical marijuana cards, issued by their doctors. The card allows them to grow the marijuana themselves, or else designate a caregiver to grow it for them. But the law as written is full of ambiguities and a bill passed by the 2005 Legislature attempts to make it easier for police, growers and patients to know what's legal.
 
The new law, which takes effect in January, specifies limits on how many plants a patient can own and stricter requirements for registering a grow site. Lawmakers also approved a hefty increase in the amount of marijuana a registered patient or caregiver can possess. The purpose of that was to bring the limits in line with the typical yield of a marijuana plant, which can produce multiple ounces of usable marijuana at a time, said Rep. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, the bill's co-sponsor.
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/news-12/112797834181531.xml&storylist=orlocal
 
U.S. DRUG CZAR, AIDE FACE METH CRITICISM
The chairman of a House panel that oversees drug policy on Wednesday called for the resignation of a top aide to White House drug czar John Walters, and he came close to demanding that Walters step down as well.
 
Rep. Mark Souder, R-Ind., spoke after a closed-door briefing in which Bush administration officials described their efforts to halt the spread of methamphetamine abuse.
 
Souder, chairman of the House committee that authorizes the activities of Walters' office, called the presentation "pathetic" and "an embarrassment." He said officials seemed more interested in defending the status quo than developing a meaningful national meth strategy.
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/front_page/1127991476181420.xml&coll=7
 
ALBANY DEMOCRAT-HERALD (NY)  
OP/ED: METH, WE NEED TO GAIN SOME PERSPECTIVE
By Angela Eckhardt
Oregonians will be feeling added pain when the next cold and flu season hits. The state is now the first in the country to require prescriptions for medicine containing pseudoephedrine, the primary ingredient in popular methamphetamine recipes.

It's easy to jump on the meth-bustin' bandwagon. The drug can wreak such havoc in people's lives that having just one addict in your family or community might seem like an epidemic.
 
Lately there has been a flurry of activity in state legislatures, Congress even in the Canadian parliament to get tough on meth. Including Oregon, 40 states have considered legislation to limit access to "precursor" ingredients. Oregon has also heightened penalties for meth-related offenses and defined meth-cooking as child abuse or neglect.
This drug "epidemic" needs to be put in perspective and meth policy needs a strong dose of sanity before policymakers exacerbate the problem.
http://www.dhonline.com/articles/2005/09/28/news/opinion/edit04.txt 

PORTLAND OREGONIAN  
PROPOSAL FOR METH SENTENCES DRAWS FIRE
House Democrats on Tuesday sharply criticized a bill designed to curb the availability of methamphetamine in the United States, singling out a provision that would impose tougher prison sentences for trafficking.
 
At a hearing in the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime, the Democratic lawmakers said incarcerating drug dealers for longer terms has failed to stop drug addiction over the past two decades, while ruining lives in poor communities.
 
The opposition is unlikely to derail House Resolution 3889, which enjoys the support of House Republican leaders and the bipartisan Congressional Meth Caucus. The chairman of the crime subcommittee, Rep. Howard Coble, R-N.C., is a co-sponsor, and spokesman Ed McDonald said Coble hopes to schedule a vote soon.
 
Still, Tuesday's hearing made clear that any vote in committee or on the floor likely would be far from unanimous. Supporters had hoped to design a meth bill free of controversial elements that would slow its progress.
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/front_page/112790509097910.xml&coll=7

MORE FAIL WORKPLACE DRUG TEST
Job applicants and workers already on the job are failing drug tests at a sharply higher rate this year, officials at Oregon's largest drug-testing labs say.While marijuana remains the most frequently detected drug, showing up in more than half of all positive tests, methamphetamine appears to be the fastest-growing illegal drug of choice among workers. Johnson said positive test rates for amphetamines increased 15 percent between 2003 and 2004 among his lab's samples. Meth is the most widely used type of amphetamine.
 
Methamphetamine is likely a bigger problem for employers in Oregon than other parts of the nation, experts say. In Oregon, amphetamines top cocaine as the second-most detected illicit substance, laboratory officials say. They rank third highest nationally behind cocaine, according to Quest Diagnostics, the nation's largest provider of employment drug tests.
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/business/112790504597910.xml&coll=7
 
FORT MASON DAILY DEMOCRAT (IA) 
METH NUMBERS CLIMB DESPITE TOUGHER LAWS
Fewer clandestine meth labs has not translated into fewer meth convictions, according to officials with the Lee County Narcotics Task Force.

Task force spokesman Sgt. Dave Hinton said that the numbers in Lee County are even inching upwards despite Iowa having some of the toughest anti-meth laws on the books.

"We do see somewhat of an increase," Hinton said, "but not a huge increase, and the increase that we see is nothing as to what we see when they have easy availability."

Hinton said that the slight increase of meth arrests comes after the initial drop following the enactment of the new meth laws. Still, Hinton said, Lee County's increase in meth use is not so much Iowa's fault as it is that of the neighboring states.
http://www.dailydem.com/articles/2005/09/28/news/news1.txt
 
NAPA DAILY NEWS (CA) 
THE IMPACT OF METH GOES FAR BEYOND THE JUSTICE SYSTEM
The little ones feel the biggest impact. That is true no matter what causes a family to fall apart, and children are the most vulnerable when it comes to the growing use of methamphetamine in Napa County.

For children, living with a parent addicted to meth can be like walking in a mine field.

"Many of these kids live in dangerous, dirty homes. Many suffer from neglect," said Nancy Schulz, behavioral health manager for the Napa County's Child Protective Services department. Schulz said CPS often gets calls from concerned family members or neighbors who suspect drug abuse is ravaging the home of someone they know.

"We have seen some very filthy homes -- disgusting. There is garbage on the floor, sometimes feces. There is very little food in the cupboards and refrigerator, and often what is in there has gone bad. We have come upon homes where the parent is passed out and there are toddlers and even infants in the home."
http://www.napanews.com/templates/printurl.cfm?id=99E16D7F-90C9-427C-B59A-DF3E221ACCA7
 
RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER (NC) 
LAW LIMITS SALE OF COLD MEDICINES
Come Jan. 15, it's going to be harder to pick up all those nasal decongestants that come in handy during cold and flu season. Gov. Mike Easley on Tuesday signed into law a measure that restricts the sale of Sudafed and other cold medicines in an effort to stop the cooking of the illegal drug methamphetamine.
 
Under the new law, buyers will have to go to a pharmacy counter, show identification and sign a log in order to buy any tablets containing pseudoephedrine and ephedrine. Gel and liquid capsules would not be affected.
 
Buyers also must be at least 18 years old. They cannot purchase more than two packages at a time, and no more than three within 30 days without a prescription. Stores without pharmacies, such as convenience stores and some groceries, won't be able to sell the medications at all.
http://www.newsobserver.com/news/story/2805337p-9249051c.html
 
KANSAS CITY STAR 
KANSAS CRIMPING METH LABS
Now it is Kansas' turn to celebrate.   Last week, Missouri Gov. Matt Blunt said a new anti-methamphetamine law was largely responsible for a 55 percent drop in the number of meth labs shut down in August.
 
In Kansas, raids are down nearly 64 percent from June through August, compared with the same period last year. This year there were 49 labs discovered in that period, down from 135 last year.
 
Laws in both states have put pseudoephedrine and ephedrine, ingredients used to make meth, behind pharmacy counters.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/local/12758144.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp 
  
ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION  
LAWMAKER TO APPEAL DENIAL OF IMMUNITY IN DUI CASE
State Rep. David Graves failed Tuesday to convince a Cobb County judge that he should be immune from prosecution for DUI because he's a lawmaker. Now he plans to take his argument to the Georgia Supreme Court. Graves (R-Macon) has two pending DUI cases in Cobb, but is trying to avoid prosecution on one of them by relying on a centuries-old and rarely used provision of the state Constitution.
 
That provision holds that state lawmakers cannot be arrested during sessions of the General Assembly or its committees or while lawmakers are traveling to either one. Exceptions are made for "treason, felony, or breach of the peace." 
Cobb State Court Judge Irma Glover on Tuesday rejected Graves' argument that he should have been granted immunity from arrest because lawmakers were in session and he was leaving a dinner meeting with other legislators when he was stopped Feb. 15 at a police roadblock in Vinings. He was arrested after refusing a sobriety test, authorities said.
 
Glover ruled that there was no evidence that the dinner, where Graves admitted to drinking two to four glasses of wine, was either a committee meeting or part of any legislative session.
http://www.ajc.com/news/content/metro/0905/28graves.html
 

WIRE SERVICE 
PERU'S HIGH COURT RULES AGAINST REGIONAL LEGALIZATION OF COCAINE-PRODUCING CROP
Peru's highest court overturned two regional laws promoting expanded cultivation of coca - the raw material for cocaine. The Constitutional Tribunal ruled unanimously Tuesday that the regional governments of Huanuco and Cuzco did not have the authority to declare the laurel-shaped leaf "cultural patrimony" earlier this year.
 
"In this case, the ordinances by the governments of Cuzco and Huanuco assumed attributes that are exclusive ... to the central government," Constitutional Tribunal President Javier Alva Orlandini told Radioprogramas radio.
 
But the 54-page court ruling also called on President Alejandro Toledo to reevaluate Peru's national counter-drug policy, saying drug interdiction and development of alternative crops to steer farmers away from the drug trade are not working.
 
More than 90 percent of Peru's coca winds up being used for cocaine production, experts say.
http://news.findlaw.com/ap/o/51/09-28-2005/bb1e0010d6b816d2.html

 

CNN
THE FALL OF KATE MOSS
                                                                                                                                                                   Barely a teenager and posing topless in a Calvin Klein underwear ad, Kate Moss sashayed her way onto magazine covers 15 years ago amid criticism of her uber-thin "heroin chic" image. Now recent pictures of Moss allegedly snorting cocaine in a London studio have turned the 31-year-old fashion icon into a pariah, with fashion companies canceling or not renewing contracts worth millions of dollars.

Moss issued an apology Thursday, taking "full responsibility for my actions." Her dramatic fall has forced a re-think on fashion's role models, and has raised questions about how an industry notorious for its drug-fueled party life can cultivate Moss' bad-girl image, then turn on her once that image matches reality.
http://edition.cnn.com/2005/SHOWBIZ/09/26/kate.moss.ap/

ABC NEWS  
HOSTAGE GAVE METH TO ATLANTA FUGITIVE
                                                                                                          
Ashley Smith, the woman who says she persuaded suspected courthouse gunman Brian Nichols to release her by talking about her faith in God, discloses in a new book that she gave him methamphetamine during the hostage ordeal. Smith did not share that detail with authorities after she talked her way out of captivity.

In her book, "Unlikely Angel," released Tuesday, the 27-year-old Smith says Nichols had her bound on her bed with masking tape and an extension cord. She says he asked for marijuana, but she did not have any, so she dug into her illegal stash of crystal meth instead. Smith, who has been in a mental hospital and has flunked out of drug rehab programs, says the seven-hour hostage ordeal led her to stop using drugs. She says she has not touched drugs since the night before she was taken hostage.                                                                 http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=1164145

USA TODAY  
METH ADDICTS HACK INTO IDENTITY THEFT
Methamphetamine addicts are using the Internet to commit identity theft, law-enforcement officials and medical experts in the USA and Canada say. Meth is a highly addictive, cheap alternative to cocaine and heroin. Meth addicts already adept at stealing personal information from mailboxes to finance drug habits now are hacking PCs to steal information, says Bob Gauthier, a detective in the Edmonton, Alberta, Police Service's meth project team.
 
In the USA, the problem is increasing "in complexity and size" in the West and Midwest, says Robert Brown, agent-in-charge of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. He says meth addicts also are participating in phishing e-mail scams and selling stolen goods on auction sites. Many are employed by ID theft rings run by non-drug users, he says.
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/computersecurity/2005-09-29-meth-id-theft_x.htm 
 
PORTLAND OREGONIAN  
AIDE DEFENDS DRUG CZAR'S STRATEGY AGAINST METH
A top aide to White House drug czar John Walters defended the administration's record on combating methamphetamine Thursday and showed no signs of heeding a Republican lawmaker's call for his resignation over the issue.
 
Dave Murray, special assistant to Walters, would not respond to remarks a day earlier by Rep. Mark Souder, R-Ind., that Murray, and potentially Walters, should step down for failing to develop a meaningful meth strategy.
 
"That's just not a serious comment, I don't think," Murray said.
 
Murray said the administration had shown "an unprecedented emphasis" on methamphetamine and denied assertions by lawmakers that the meth problem has been assigned a low priority.
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/news/1128077746224240.xml&coll=7
 
WIRE SERVICE  
AS U.S. METH LABS DRY UP, MEXICAN CARTELS STEP IN
As Congress considers restrictions on the sale of cold pills used to make methamphetamine, it might want to look at what's happened in Oklahoma, which has slashed the number of home meth labs yet failed to curb meth use.

Oklahoma last year became the first state to make consumers visit a pharmacy counter to buy cold medicine containing the meth ingredient pseudoephedrine. Lab seizures plunged from 90 a month in 2003 to nine in June, state officials say. Fires and chemical hazards now pose a smaller threat to neighborhoods and children of meth cooks.

But police say a massive influx of meth made by Mexican "superlabs," which can obtain tons of pseudoephedrine, has kept meth plentiful and potent. The number of Oklahoma users shows no sign of falling, and property crime still keeps the Oklahoma County Jail at capacity.
 
Two decades of government effort have failed to curb the availability of meth. A new analysis of federal data by The Oregonian newspaper in Portland, Ore., shows that the drug's potency has hit levels not seen in a decade. Rising purity indicates the supply of meth is growing, and it means a $25 bag of meth will last a user longer.
http://www.newhousenews.com/archive/suo092905.html

 

OTHER MOMSTELL HEADLINE ISSUES ON DPNA.ORG