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U.K. Study Finds Alcohol is Real 'Date-Rape' Drug

Join Together, November 16, 2006

Research Summary

A U.K. study on the use of so-called "date-rape" drugs found that a familiar drug was involved in most sexual assaults: alcohol.

The Guardian reported Nov. 16 that the study found no examples of the drug Rohypnol being used in rapes but plenty of evidence that alcohol was involved. Just two cases of the 120 examined showed evidence that GHB, another drug linked to sex assaults, was involved. But 119 of the cases involved victims who had been drinking.

"In most cases, the alleged victims had consumed alcohol voluntarily and, in some cases, to dangerous levels," a spokesman for the Association of Chief Police Officers, which conducted the study, said. "The report does not seek to deny or neutralize the incidence of drug-facilitated sexual assault, but merely view the topic in the context of alcohol and other related issues."

Among the victims who had used alcohol, 22 were found to have blood-alcohol levels two to three times higher than the legal limit. And 57 of the victims had traces of other controlled substances in their bodies, including cannabis, cocaine, and amphetamines or Ecstasy.