Drug & Alcohol Headline Week in Review from MOMSTELL.COM

August 28, 2004 Edition

 

1) INTRODUCTION
2) MEDICAL MARIJUANA USE PETITIONS FILED
3
) STATE PONDERS LIMITING COLD PILLS IN METH WAR
4)
SCHOOLS REJECT DRUG TESTING POLICY
5) STILL DRINKING AND DRIVING
6)
CATCHING METH COOKS PINK-HANDED
7) CLAMPDOWN ON CANADIAN BORDER
8) BALTIMORE LAUDS ITS NEEDLE EXCHANGE
9) CENTRAL VA. FIGHTS GROWING METH TRAFFIC
10) MARIJUANA RIGHTS GROUP UNITING BEHIND KERRY
11) MARIJUANA QUESTIONS ON SEVERAL LOCAL BALLOTS
12) MEXICO ARRESTS CARTEL FIGURE
13) SHIFT IN INMATE REHAB SIGNALED
14) METH CRACKDOWN SIGNED INTO LAW
15) IOWA DRUG BABY NUMBERS CONTINUE TO SOAR
16) JAILED, FORGOTTEN: PLIGHT OF MENTALLY ILL DETAILED
17) NARCONON BANNED FROM S.F. SCHOOLS - ANTI-DRUG TEACHING TIES DO      SCIENTOLOGY CALLED  INACCURATE
18) PUTTING CAPS ON TEENAGE DRINKING
19)BILL OKS FOOD STAMPS FOR SOME DRUG FELONS
20) DWI DEATHS DROP AFTER FEDERAL AD CAMPAIGN
21) "ALCOHOL WITHOUT LIQUID" VAPORIZER MACHINE DEBUTS
22) MINNEAPOLIS COUNCIL REJECTS MEDICAL MARIJUANA INITIATIVE
23) AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS OPPOSES LEGALIZATION OF MARIJUANA
24) CONGRESS APPROVES FUNDS TO EXPAND PARENT CORPS


INTRODUCTION

There is alot of news this week. The so-called medical marijuana issue continues to make headlines as well as alot of methamphetamine use!  Student drug testing is being challenged in  California.  We continue to write letters to educate  Governor Schwarzenegger on the dangers of this bill( SB1386). The are two funding issues to be concerned about, the Drug Free Communities funding and the National Guards funding for the Drug Demand Reduction Program(NCTC). We need these programs!

Sharon

Sharon L. Smith
President-MOMSTELL
Box 450
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 17055

www.momstell.com

ARKANSAS NEWS
MEDICAL MARIJUANA USE PETITIONS FILED

Supporters of a proposal to legalize marijuana for medical use delivered 30,000 new signatures on Wednesday and resubmitted more than 17,000 after having them notarized in an effort to get the measure on the Nov. 2 ballot.

The deadline to submit the additional signatures was Wednesday.
http://www.arkansasnews.com/archive/2004/08/26/News/279689.html


SEATTLE TIMES  
EDITORIAL: DOCS AND PAIN
New guidelines for prescription painkillers represent an equitable strategy for physicians and federal drug enforcement.
 
The rules balance the need for stronger vigilance of illicit prescription-drug use with doctors' need to aggressively treat pain. Non-medical use of prescription drugs ranks second only to marijuana use as the most commonly abused drug in the U.S. One drug, OxyContin, is blamed in more than 100 deaths. It is appropriate, then, for the Drug Enforcement Administration, by regulating doctors who prescribe opioid painkillers such as morphine and OxyContin, to combat prescription-drug misuse.
 
But some efforts have had a chilling effect on the medical profession. The arrest of 50 doctors nationwide last year on charges that they prescribed or distributed controlled substances beyond the scope of medical practice led doctors to fear if they prescribed significant amounts of painkillers they would be singled out by law enforcement.
 
The new guidelines should go a long way toward easing doctors' fears. Created by a team of physicians and the nation's top cops, they help law-enforcement agents and prosecutors distinguish aggressive pain management from drug diversion.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/PrintStory.pl?

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION
STATE PONDERS LIMITING COLD PILLS IN METH WAR
Gov. Sonny Perdue said Wednesday he will study whether restricting sales of cold pills might help Georgia in its fight against methamphetamine.
 
"We know that Oklahoma has done that with some purported success," Perdue said in an interview after a two-day meth summit he convened at the Omni Hotel in Atlanta.
 
Under an Oklahoma law that took effect in April, only pharmacies may sell tablets containing pseudoephedrine, such as Sudafed, a key ingredient used to make the illegal stimulant methamphetamine.
 
Convenience stories and other retailers had to remove the tablets from their shelves. And pharmacies must keep the drugs behind their counters and require customers to show photo identification and sign for the medicine.
 
Oklahoma reports a dramatic decrease in meth labs since the law took effect. The number of labs raided dropped from 100 in March to 50 in June.
 
Oklahoma's law was a hot topic among law-enforcement officers at Georgia's meth summit, the first such gathering in Georgia. By the summit's end Wednesday, they had recommended that the governor explore seeking a similar law for Georgia.
http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/0804/19meth.html 

THE WASHINGTON TIMES  
SCHOOLS REJECT DRUG TESTING POLICY
Officials in eight of nine school districts in Northern Virginia say they will not administer drug tests to students participating in extracurricular events, though new state guidelines clarify the procedure.
 
The Virginia General Assembly voted in favor of drug testing two years ago, and in June the state's education department issued guidelines on the nonmandatory testing.

The random drug testing of students gained national attention in 1995 then in 2001 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the practice in Oregon and Oklahoma public schools, respectively, was constitutional.
 
Drug testing in schools has gradually increased in the United States, especially in California, as more students, particularly athletes, have shown signs of taking drugs.
 
The National Institute of Citizen Anti-Drug Policy and the group Drug Free Kids: America's Challenge have endorsed Virginia's drug-testing law and guidelines.
http://www.washtimes.com/metro/20040818-100608-2548r.htm
 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS  
STILL DRINKING AND DRIVING
Thousands of motorists in Colorado are ticking time bombs, continuing to drive drunk even after they've had their licenses yanked.
 
A Rocky Mountain News review of state driving offenses for one year found:
 

  • About 11 motorists a day are caught driving with a revoked license or a license with restrictions because of a drinking and driving offense.
  • Every five or six hours in Colorado, someone is cited by police for at least the second time for drinking and driving.
  • Repeat drunken-driving offenders often kill themselves or other people on the road.
  • Four of every 10 drunken drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2002 had at least one prior arrest for DUI.
     
    These stubborn repeat offenders confound prosecutors.

WIRED  
CATCHING METH COOKS PINK-HANDED  
It may fall a shade shy of catching thieves redhanded, but for farmers fed up with methamphetamine cooks filching their fertilizer, staining them pink will do just fine.
 
Assuming you can discourage thieves you cannot easily catch, a new product called GloTell -- which is added to tanks of anhydrous ammonia -- will not only besmirch the hands of those who touch the fertilizer, but leaves its mark on anyone who snorts or shoots the end product.
 
GloTell is already proving to be a handy deterrent, but details had to be worked out between its birth as a farmer's brainstorm and finished product. The additive had to withstand the cold, corrosive nature of anhydrous ammonia. It had to be safe for the environment, safe for crops and even safe around children.
 
And in the two years it took to develop GloTell, researchers at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale found it did much more than just stain thieves pink. The visible stain, even if washed off, was still detectable by ultraviolet light 24 to 72 hours later. As an added benefit, the additive helped farmers detect any tank leaks, said Truitt Clements, spokesman for Illinois-based GloTell Distributors.
http://www.wired.com/news/print/0,1294,64672,00.html 

LOS ANGELES
CLAMPDOWN ON CANADIAN BORDER

BELLINGHAM, Wash. As part of a sharp increase in surveillance of the border with Canada, federal officials Friday dedicated the first of five planned bases for regular flights to look for drug runners and others crossing illegally by air or land.

The Bellingham Air Marine Branch is to have a staff of about 70, two helicopters, an airplane and a high-speed boat by year's end.

Similar bases have policed the U.S.-Mexico border for three decades, but the new facility is the first on the Canadian border.

The five new bases, which will dot the border from Washington state to upstate New York, are a response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as well as smuggling of illegal aliens and drugs, including British Columbia's potent strains of marijuana.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-na-border21aug21,1,6092970,print.story?coll=la-news-a_section

WASHINGTON POST  
BALTIMORE LAUDS ITS NEEDLE EXCHANGE
In Baltimore, the nation's largest city-run exchange program for used intravenous drug needles has taken more than 6 million needles off the city's heroin-ravaged streets, the city's health commissioner said yesterday.
 
The aim of the program is to reduce the spread of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The program has enrolled more than 14,000 addicts and tested more than 2,800 people for HIV, said Peter Beilenson, the city health commissioner.
 
"Is it perfect? No. Do people still share needles sometimes? Sure. But the fact that 6 million fewer needles have been shared clearly has had an impact," Beilenson said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A20391-2004Aug20.html
 
WASHINGTON POST
CENTRAL VA. FIGHTS GROWING METH TRAFFIC
If different colors stood for different illicit drugs, a narcotics map of the Washington region would look like a kaleidoscope: everything everywhere, in every direction. There are trends -- heroin in Baltimore, crack in the District, "club drugs" such as Ecstasy in Northern Virginia, but drug enforcement officials describe the area as a hodgepodge.
With one exception.
 
Virginia's Shenandoah Valley is isolated in its affair with methamphetamine, a powerfully addictive drug made with ingredients that sound less-than-intoxicating, such as battery acid, cold medicine and drain cleaner.
 
In the past five years, meth has become the No. 1 drug seized along the north-south corridor between Winchester and Harrisonburg, a belt that parallels Skyline Drive as well as Interstate 81. What stumps local authorities is that the deadly wave of meth, which began rolling east from Mexico and California in the 1990s, seems to have stopped -- or paused -- in central Virginia.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A22594-2004Aug21?language=printer
 
BOSTON GLOBE
MARIJUANA RIGHTS GROUP UNITING BEHIND KERRY
SEATTLE -- More than 150,000 denizens of the Northwest will gather this weekend in a waterfront park for Hempfest, billed as the largest promarijuana gathering in the country, to listen to speeches from the biggest names in the national drug-law reform movement between band sets and bong hits.
 
But this year, attendees will hear an explicitly partisan message, too: Organizers are pushing pot smokers to help elect Senator John F. Kerry president.
 
The size of Hempfest indicates the potential power of the pro-pot vote, particularly in the Northwest, reformers said. Organizers think that registering even a few thousand Hempfest attendees could make the difference in a close election. ''It is essential for our crowd to understand that there is nothing more important they can do for drug policy reform than to go out and cast their ballots in the Democratic box in November," said Dominic Holden, 27, a spokesman for the festival.
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2004/08/20/marijuana_rights_group_uniting_behind_kerry?mode=PF
 
BOSTON GLOBE
MARIJUANA QUESTIONS ON SEVERAL LOCAL BALLOTS
Drug reform activists, convinced that law enforcement resources would be better spent on other crimes, will ask voters in several area communities this fall to weigh in on reducing penalties for marijuana possession.
 
Proponents of the change have succeeded in getting a series of nonbinding questions -- meant to gauge public opinion -- on ballots this November in communities across Greater Boston. In Bellingham and Milford, voters will consider the legality of medicinal marijuana -- allowing seriously ill patients to grow the drug for medical use. In Boylston, Northborough, Franklin, and parts of Medway, voters will weigh in on whether the penalty for possession should be reduced from a criminal charge to a civil violation subject to a fine.
 
According to state law, first-time marijuana offenders are typically placed on probation, but the law also allows for imprisonment and fines for possession. Opponents of relaxing the rules say marijuana use is often the first step toward drug addiction and see no point in amending current policies, but supporters of the change say it's a waste of money to prosecute low-level possession offenses.
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2004/08/22/marijuana_questions_on_several_local_ballots?mode=PF 
  
LOS ANGELES TIMES
MEXICO ARRESTS CARTEL FIGURE
One of Mexico's most wanted drug-trafficking suspects was captured without a shot fired over the weekend, authorities said Monday, the latest in a series of high-profile arrests by Mexican law enforcement using intelligence supplied by U.S. anti-narcotics agents.

The arrest of Gilberto Higuera Guerrero at a safe house in Mexicali in Baja California on Sunday morning is a major victory in President Vicente Fox's campaign against major drug cartels. Leaders in each of the four largest groups have been arrested in recent months, although officials say the flow of drugs through Mexico into the United States probably has not waned.

It is also the latest example of the growing cooperation between U.S. and Mexican law enforcement, which have worked in tandem to pull off several recent captures. American officials say they are increasingly impressed with the willingness of Mexican anti-drug forces to act on U.S. surveillance information, an inclination not always evident in the past.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-drugbust24aug24,1,4425862,print.story?coll=la-news-a_section 
  

LOS ANGELES TIMES  
SHIFT IN INMATE REHAB SIGNALED
Signaling a sharp turn in attitudes about rehabilitating state prisoners, lawmakers Tuesday approved a sweeping new program to give inmates more schooling and job training to better prepare them for release.

By the slimmest of margins, the state Assembly endorsed a bill aimed at reducing the huge proportion of ex-convicts who commit new crimes or parole violations and wind up back behind bars. If signed by the governor, the bill would trigger "an unprecedented shift" in the mission of state prisons, an Assembly analysis said.
 
The bill would require corrections officials to evaluate inmates' educational and "psychosocial" needs within 90 days of their incarceration and tailor a schooling program for them, one that would include vocational training and high school equivalency degrees. The new approach would be phased in over three years beginning in January 2006, and would not apply to convicts on death row or those serving life without the possibility of parole.

A spokesman for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said the governor had no position on the bill. At the Department of Corrections, however, officials were opposed for fiscal reasons. They said the legislation would create an onerous and costly new burden, requiring them to craft an individualized education and job-training plan for each inmate.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-bills25aug25,1,3634797,print.story?coll=la-headlines-pe-california
 
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES  
METH CRACKDOWN SIGNED INTO LAW
Drug stores will have to start locking up common cold medicines that contain chemicals used to make methamphetamine and limiting sales of those medicines to two at a time under a bill Gov. Blagojevich signed Tuesday.
 
The new law, initiated by Attorney General Lisa Madigan, also requires that the medicines themselves contain no more than three grams of ingredients used in meth production.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-drugs25.html 
 
QUAD-CITY TIMES (IA)  
IOWA DRUG BABY NUMBERS CONTINUE TO SOAR
The number of drug-affected babies born to Iowa mothers nearly tripled last year and state officials say the numbers continue to climb.
.
Last year, 1,167 children almost all of them newborns tested positive for illegal drugs. That's up from 397 in 2002, said Vern Armstrong, chief of the state Bureau of Protective Services, a branch of the Iowa Department of Human Services.
.
He said the trend is continuing, with 719 cases reported for the first half of 2004. He projects that number to reach 1,500 this year.
http://www.qctimes.com/internal.php?story_id=1033734&t=Iowa+%2F+Illinois&c=24,1033734

SYDNEY MORNING HERALD (Australia)  
JAILED, FORGOTTEN: PLIGHT OF MENTALLY ILL DETAILED
Australia's neglect of mental health services is regressing to a "lock them up and throw away the key" approach, with many mentally ill people ending up wrongly in prison, according to the Human Rights Commissioner, Sev Ozdowski.
 
Dr Ozdowski said the commission had been presented with "horrifying" evidence of the failure of mental health services to give appropriate care, particularly for disturbed young people.
 
Recent community forums held by the commission and the Mental Health Council showed an endemic lack of services, particularly for those whose conditions were worsened by drugs.
 
"I listened to many, many first-hand accounts where alcohol and drugs were linked to schizophrenia and depression. Stories about violent behaviour, suicide attempts and endless bouts of hospitalisation and imprisonment," Dr Ozdowski told the National Press Club.
 
He said a frequently mentioned issue at the forums was the evidence that widespread use of marijuana, amphetamines, alcohol and ecstasy was contributing to an increased rate of mental illness among young people.
http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/08/25/1093246620709.html?oneclick=true
 
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE  
NARCONON BANNED FROM S.F. SCHOOLS - ANTI-DRUG TEACHING TIES DO SCIENTOLOGY CALLED INACCURATE
An anti-drug program with ties to the Church of Scientology will be barred from San Francisco classrooms because of concerns about its scientific accuracy, city schools Superintendent Arlene Ackerman said Tuesday.
 
Ackerman's decision followed a review of the Narconon Drug Prevention & Education Program by school health officials, who found that some of its teachings were not "100 percent accurate.''
 
Ackerman said her concern was raised after The Chronicle revealed in June that Narconon's classroom lectures reflected Scientology's beliefs about drugs and anatomy -- such as the idea that drug residues remain indefinitely in body fat and cause recurring flashbacks and drug cravings.
 
In addition to barring Narconon, Ackerman said San Francisco schools will implement a stricter policy forbidding outsiders from teaching children until their curriculum has been reviewed and approved.
 
Each year, dozens of groups lecture students, from Alcoholics Anonymous to Magicians With a Message.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2004/08/25/MNGG18DVGD1.DTL&type=printable 
 
NEW YORK TIMES
PUTTING CAPS ON TEENAGE DRINKING

by Jim Gogek
A year ago, at the request of Congress, the National Academy of Sciences issued a nationwide strategy to reduce underage drinking. It hasn't been adopted, and since then more than 3,000 Americans have been killed and nearly 1 million injured in traffic crashes, shootings, stabbings, beatings, drownings, burns, suicide attempts and alcohol poisonings - all linked to underage drinking.
 
And there have been more than 1.1 million property crimes and nearly 400,000 incidents of high-risk sex among youths, according to research conducted over the years by our institute.
 
This week, nearly 1,000 prevention advocates and alcohol law enforcement officers are meeting at a conference in San Diego to promote the recommendations from the National Academy report. But despite their dedication to the cause, they probably won't succeed - without a lot more help from Washington. A few federal agencies have taken small steps, and two pieces of legislation have been developed but sit languishing. Lawmakers may be too preoccupied right now to tackle a thorny social problem. And the power of the alcohol lobby makes everybody in Washington skittish.
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/25/opinion/25gogek.html?pagewanted=print&position= 
  

LOS ANGELES TIMES  
BILL OKS FOOD STAMPS FOR SOME DRUG FELONS
The California Senate approved legislation Wednesday allowing certain drug felons to receive food stamps, in an effort to reverse a nearly eight-year ban enacted when the state overhauled the welfare system.

Although the food stamp program is funded entirely by the federal government, the state has the right to set certain rules for people using it. In 1997, California prohibited people convicted of possessing, manufacturing or selling drugs from receiving food stamps for their entire lives.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-bills26aug26,1,7895571,print.story?coll=la-headlines-california 
  
HOUSTON CHRONICLE  
DWI DEATHS DROP AFTER FEDERAL AD CAMPAIGN
Drunken-driving deaths fell in all but one of 13 states targeted by a campaign that includes money for ads and enforcement efforts to get drinkers off the road, the government said Wednesday.
 
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration wants to expand the $5 million program, if Congress approves a long-delayed highway bill.
 
NHTSA spent $10.5 million on advertising in 2003 and $14 million in 2004. In both years, $5 million went to the 13 states, which were targeted because of their high death rates from drunken driving.
 
The program paid for ads around the July 4 and Labor Day holidays. States added to that by increasing the number of police officers and highway checkpoints.
 
Nationally, drunken-driving deaths dropped 3 percent in 2003, from 17,524 to 17,013. That was the first decline since 1999. Twenty-eight states had fewer alcohol-related deaths.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/printstory.mpl/nation/2759977 
 
 

EDUCATING VOICES
"ALCOHOL WITHOUT LIQUID" VAPORIZER MACHINE DEBUTS

A machine that lets its users inhale liquor by mixing it with pressurized oxygen is debuting in Manhattan. The machine makers say it takes about 20 minutes to inhale one vaporized shot, leaving users euphoric, but not drunk, and without the aftereffects of alcohol. Existing state law is not the only obstacle the machine faces. Westchester County Executive Andrew Spano has said he wants the AWOL machine prohibited for fear it will attract underage drinkers, and State Sen. Carl Kruger has pledged to introduce legislation to ban it.  Associated Press, August 23, 2004.

For the entire article click on www.educatingvoices.org/EVINews.asp


MINNEAPOLIS-ST PAUL STAR TRIBUNE

MINNEAPOLIS COUNCIL REJECTS MEDICAL MARIJUANA INITIATIVE
The Minneapolis City Council's Intergovernmental Relations Committee voted against putting a medical-marijuana ballot question before voters this November. The action could lead to a lawsuit from Citizens for Harm Reduction, which pushed for the initiative, the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star Tribune reported Aug. 18.

Committee chairman Scott Benson said the initiative contradicts current state and federal laws. The measure would have amended the City Charter "to require that the City Council shall authorize, license, and regulate a reasonable number of medicinal-marijuana distribution centers in the city of Minneapolis as is necessary to provide services to patients who have been recommended medicinal marijuana by a medical or osteopathic doctor licensed to practice in the state of Minnesota to the extent permitted by state and federal law."

The Washington, D.C.-based Marijuana Policy Project (MPP), which is funding the Citizens for Harm Reduction group, said it would sue to get the initiative on the ballot. "We are fully prepared to go to court and to spend whatever it takes to prevent the city's voters from being disenfranchised," said Neal Levine, director of public policy at MPP.The entire council is expected to consider the measure at its next meeting, but a similar outcome is expected.
 
DELAWARE NEW JOURNAL
MARIJUANA GROWER BLAMED FOR FATAL FIRE
Man charged in firefighters' deaths

By DAVID B. CARUSO
Associated Press
08/22/2004

PHILADELPHIA -- A blaze that killed two firefighters Friday began in a tangle of wires, fans and high-powered lamps that a man had set up in a basement closet to grow marijuana, authorities said.  The man police believe was responsible for the array has been arrested and charged with third-degree murder. Fire Capt. John Taylor, 53, and firefighter Rey Rubio, 42, died when they were trapped by quick-moving flames as they worked near the source of the smoky blaze in the home's cellar.

Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham called suspect Daniel Brough "reckless," "foolish" and "greedy" for his role in the deaths. "This is unacceptable criminal conduct," she said. Brough, 35, faces other charges, including marijuana possession, involuntary manslaughter and causing a catastrophe.

Fire officials said the blaze apparently started in the electrical circuits set up to run the equipment used to nurture the marijuana plants, and spread more quickly because the hot lights had dried out the wood in the closet. Authorities say the firefighters were working in the basement of the row house in the Port Richmond section of the city when they ran into trouble. Taylor triggered a distress button on his radio, but rescuers could not get to them in time. The men appear to have died of smoke inhalation, officials said.

Taylor was a 32-year veteran of the department. He had a wife and two children. Rubio had one child, and is survived by his mother, father and nine siblings. He had been fighting fires for 12 years. Both men had been decorated for their service to the city. They were the second and third firefighters to die this year in Philadelphia. Fire Lt. Derrick Harvey, 45, suffered fatal burns fighting a blaze in January.

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS OPPOSES
LEGALIZATION OF MARIJUANA

The June issue of Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, featured a policy statement entitled "Legalization of Marijuana:  Potential Impact on Youth".  It should be noted that their two recommendations (see below) endorse scientific research on cannabinoids, not cannabis/marijuana, i.e., legitimate scientific research into possible medical applications for the more than 60 cannabinoids found in the marijuana plant.

"RECOMMENDATIONS:

1. The American Academy of Pediatrics opposes the legalization of marijuana

2. The American Academy of Pediatrics supports rigorous scientific research regarding the use of cannabinoids for the relief of symptoms not currently ameliorated by existing legal drug formulations.


The Policy statement notes:
"In contrast [to their recommendation for scientific research] the significant neuropharmacologic, cognitive, behavioral, and somatic consequences of acute and long-term marijuana use are well known and include negative effects on short-term memory, concentration, attention span, motivation, and problem solving, which clearly interfere with learning; adverse effects on coordination, judgment, reaction time, and tracking ability, which contribute substantially to unintentional deaths and injuries among adolescents (especially those associated with motor vehicles); and negative health effects with repeated use similar to effects seen with smoking tobacco."


FOX NEWS:
CONGRESS APPROVES FUNDS TO EXPAND PARENT CORPS

The U.S. Congress has approved more than $4 million in funding to expand Parent Corps, a grassroots organization to fight alcohol and other drugs, Fox News reported Aug. 19.

Currently, Parent Corps has chapters in three states. The latest funding will expand the initiative to nine states. "Our goal is to have each parent leader mobilize 400 parent volunteers," said Sue Rusche, executive director of National Families in Action.

The federal funds will be used to recruit parents, train them, and pay for two Parent Corps organizers in each of the states.

Parent Corps works to reduce alcohol and other drug use among children. "Though schools are able to provide an awful lot, in many ways they have taken on too many parental roles, and it would be nice to put it back in the parents hands," said Dana Smith, a parent.

Parent Corps hopes to have a full-time parent leader in every school in the nation by 2014.

 

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