Drug & Alcohol Headline Week in Review from MOMSTELL.COM

September 4, 2004 Edition

 

1) OPIUM TRADE STILL ENTRENCHED ACROSS DESPERATE AFGHANISTAN
2)
OP/ED: GOVERNMENT IS RIGHT ON DANGER POSED BY MARIJUANA
3
) JUDGE THROWS OUT ATLANTIC CITY'S ANTI-AIDS NEEDLE EXCHANGE
4) MARIJUANA, PUBLIC EMPLOYEES PETITIONS FAIL TO QUALIFY IN NEVADA
5) FEDS TO RETURN MEDICAL-POT GEAR
6)
COUNTY TO HALT MILITARY-STYLE REHAB
7) METHADONE ABUSE ON RISE IN OREGON
8) NO KNOCKDOWNS YET IN SOROS VS. HASTERT
9)
RULING LIMITS POT RAIDS
10)
RESEARCHERS LOOK AT EXISTING DRUGS TO TREAT ADDICTION
11) PRISON GUARDS FIND BASKETBALL FULL OF POT  
12) JURY REMAINS OUT ON DRUG COURT'S FATE
13) NOT LOOKING GOOD FOR MARIJUANA AMENDMENT
14)
KENTUCKY BILL WOULD LET FAMILIES COMMIT DRUG USERS TO REHAB
15) ADOLESCENT TREATMENT ADMISSIONS INCREASE IN 2002
16) ANTI-DRUG TESTING BILL THREATENS STUDENT
17) THE GOVERNMENT MIGHT BE RIGHT ABOUT MARIJUANA

18) DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES (DFC) SUPPORT PROGRAM FUNDING INCREASE IN JEOPARDY  



 

LOS ANGELES TIMES  
OPIUM TRADE STILL ENTRENCHED ACROSS DESPERATE AFGHANISTAN
For the last three years, the American-led coalition in Afghanistan has tried to pacify the country while fighting the Taliban, which the allies ousted from power.

The British have taken the lead in eradicating the poppy cultivation, the basis of the resurgent drug trade. Experts believe that profits from the drugs are funding terrorist activities by the Taliban and Hizb-i-Islami.

To fight the trade, Germans, British and French are helping set up a counter-narcotics police force whose duties include searches at vehicle checkpoints, an eradication unit that destroys crops and a force trained by British SAS commandos.

But those efforts are too recent to put a dent in an industry that earned farmers and traffickers $2.3 billion last year, more than half the country's gross domestic product, according to United Nations estimates.
 
Some drug experts believe Hizb-i-Islami, a terrorist group headed by warlord Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, earns money from 10% to 15% of the opium crops, and channels $120 million a year to Islamist groups in Chechnya and Uzbekistan.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/asection/la-fg-drugs1sep01,1,215472,print.story?coll=la-news-a_section 
 
NEW HAMPSHIRE UNION LEADER  
OP/ED: GOVERNMENT IS RIGHT ON DANGER POSED BY MARIJUANA
by Kevin A. Sabet
The federal government recently announced that the growing potency of America's most popular illegal drug, marijuana, and the number of kids seeking help to get off the drug (one in five users) worried them so much that they were soliciting new marijuana-research proposals and urging local law enforcement to crack down on those who sell the drug.
 
The pro-marijuana lobby was furious and immediately charged the feds with fear-mongering and clamoring to protect their (not so glamorous, actually) jobs in Washington, D.C. Their cries rested on claims that more potent marijuana is not tantamount to more dangerous marijuana and that the rise in the number of treatment beds for marijuana users is due to criminal justice referrals, not the drug's harmfulness.
But the evidence shows the government indeed might have it right.
http://www.theunionleader.com/articles_showfast.html?article=43194 

 NEWARK STAR LEDGER  
JUDGE THROWS OUT ATLANTIC CITY'S ANTI-AIDS NEEDLE EXCHANGE
A judge invalidated an Atlantic City ordinance yesterday that authorized the local health department to distribute hypodermic needles to help prevent intravenous drug users from contracting AIDS.
 
Superior Court Judge H. Valerie Armstrong said municipalities lack the authority to institute such programs. Her ruling, which the city plans to appeal, also raises doubt about a similar ordinance approved by Camden this summer but not yet implemented.
 
The decision came as lawmakers were working with Gov. James E. McGreevey on a plan to change New Jersey law to make hypodermic needles legally available to drug users. On Tuesday, McGreevey said he would seek to legalize needle exchange programs before he leaves office Nov. 15.
 
New Jersey ranks fifth among the states in the number of AIDS cases. State health officials say 60 percent of those cases can be attributed to drug use -- twice the national average.
 
The idea of giving addicts clean syringes has been debated by state officials for the past decade. New Jersey and Delaware are the only states that ban all forms of needle distribution and decriminalization.
http://www.nj.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/news-2/10941052737610.xml 
  
LAS VEGAS SUN  
MARIJUANA, PUBLIC EMPLOYEES PETITIONS FAIL TO QUALIFY IN NEVADA
A review of petitions to ban public employees serving in the Nevada Legislature and legalize small amounts of marijuana shows both lack enough signatures to qualify for the November ballot, Secretary of State Dean Heller said Wednesday.
 
Heller said the public employees petition had 44,548 valid signatures, while the marijuana petition had 49,412 names. Each needed a minimum of 51,227.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nevada/2004/sep/01/090110417.html 
 
 
DENVER POST  
FEDS TO RETURN MEDICAL-POT GEAR
Federal authorities will return marijuana-growing equipment to a chronically ill Aurora man whose medicinal pot was seized by authorities in May.
 
As a result, Dana May will drop a lawsuit he filed earlier this week against the Aurora Police Department, claiming that officers and Drug Enforcement Administration agents wrongly seized 2 ounces of marijuana the state permitted him to possess.
 
While May won't get his pot back, he said the return of his equipment was all he needed to claim victory.
 
The equipment, a complex system that involved growing lamps and a carbon-dioxide pump, is valued at $4,000, May said.
 
A spokesman for the U.S. attorney's office said the growing equipment was not worth going through civil-court forfeiture proceedings, because of its value and the fact that May is not a criminal user.
http://www.denverpost.com/cda/article/print/0,1674,36%257E53%257E2362227,00.html 
 
HOUSTON CHRONICLE
COUNTY TO HALT MILITARY-STYLE REHAB
Next month, Harris County officials will shut down the military-style boot camp program that opened in 1991. Replacing it at the minimum-security campus will be a residential program that officials say will foster a more therapeutic environment designed to address problems such as substance abuse and underlying criminal psychology.
 
The move is part of a trend across Texas and the rest of the nation, as experts have concluded in recent years that boot camps and military-style training are not as effective at rehabilitating criminals as some other techniques. Experts now say the best approach is a structured, classroom
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/front/2764919  
 
 
 
SEATTLE TIMES  
METHADONE ABUSE ON RISE IN OREGON
For nearly 50 years, under carefully controlled circumstances, methadone has helped heroin addicts weather the pain of withdrawal.
 
But in the 1990s, the drug began to be prescribed by the Oregon Health Plan to treat pain in general, giving the drug an unexpected boost. Now, doctors say they have lost control of the drug, which they believe is being abused.
In 2002, methadone killed 103 Oregonians — two more than heroin — making it the state's most lethal drug.
 
Use of the drug has seen a dramatic spike.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/PrintStory.pl?document_id=2002020967&zsection_id=2001780260&slug=methadone31m&date=20040831 
 
THE HILL  
NO KNOCKDOWNS YET IN SOROS VS. HASTERT
Public hostilities between House Speaker J. Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.) and George Soros, the billionaire donor to the Democratic Party, went into overdrive yesterday.

In a letter, the Speaker chided the activist philanthropist for his efforts to legalize recreational drug use and received in return a second demand for a public apology.

The spat began on Sunday television, when Hastert cast aspersions on Soros's financial sources. Yesterday, the Speaker neither apologized nor backed up his suggestion but said he was referring to drug-legalization pressure groups rather than criminal cartels.

That cut no ice with Soros, who is considering suing Hastert for slander, said his spokesman, Michael Vachon. Hastert spokesman John Feehery did not return a call for comment.
http://www.hillnews.com/news/090204/soros.aspx 
   

FAIRBANKS DAILY NEWS-MINER  
RULING LIMITS POT RAIDS
The Alaska Court of Appeals ruled Friday that police cannot execute a search warrant in a person's home for possession of less than 4 ounces of marijuana.
 
Attorney General Gregg Renkes says he will appeal the ruling to the state Supreme Court and that he is "fearful that this will shut down effective investigation of marijuana growing cases."
 
The Appeals Court ruled in the case of Leo Richardson Crocker Jr., who was charged with controlled substance misconduct after police, acting on a tip, searched his Anchor Point home and found marijuana and growing equipment.
 
A lower court ruled the search warrant that led to the arrest should have never been issued and suppressed the evidence against Crocker. The Appeals Court agreed.
 
The opinion is the latest decision that has carved out protections for possessing marijuana in an Alaska home. The state Supreme Court in 1975 ruled that an adult's rights to limited marijuana possession was protected under the state constitution's privacy provisions. Last year, the Appeals Court defined that limit as 4 ounces.
 
The Appeals Court also struck down a 1990 voter initiative that criminalized possession of any amount of marijuana.
http://www.news-miner.com/Stories/0,1413,113~7244~2365652,00.html#
 
WASHINGTON TIMES
RESEARCHERS LOOK AT EXISTING DRUGS TO TREAT ADDICTION
Can Prozac help you kick cocaine? Can Ritalin? How about a blood--pressure pill or medicine for muscle spasms?

If you're an alcoholic, could you get help staying sober by taking an anti-nausea drug used by cancer patients?

Scientists are exploring those questions. In fact, in the field of addiction medicine, one of the hottest sources of new drugs is old drugs.

Despite years of research, no drug has been approved in the United States for treating cocaine dependence. To find such a treatment, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is sponsoring human studies of 21 medicines already on the market for something else. That is about two-thirds of all the potential cocaine drugs being tested in people, says Frank Vocci, director of NIDA's pharmacotherapy division.

At the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), nearly all the potential alcoholism drugs tested in people under institute sponsorship in the past 10 years had been approved for some other use, said Raye Litten, co-leader of the institute's medications development team.
http://www.washingtontimes.com/functions/print.php?StoryID=20040829-114529-1002r
 
WASHINGTON POST
PRISON GUARDS FIND BASKETBALL FULL OF POT
Basketballs are usually puffed up with air, but somebody found a way of inflating one with a substance usually associated with puffing of another kind.
 
Oklahoma State Penitentiary officials cut into an exercise-yard basketball and found nearly two pounds of what is believed to be marijuana stuffed inside.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A56261-2004Sep2.html

HOUSTON CHRONICLE
JURY REMAINS OUT ON DRUG COURT'S FATE
Her mix of success and setbacks over the past year has mirrored the path of the fledgling drug court program, which is working to keep her and dozens of other low-level drug offenders out of jail.
 
One year after its founding, Harris County's first attempt at the treatment-focused drug court has struggled to find enough money to keep operating. State lawmakers ordered its creation last year but did not provide a funding source, leaving programs in various cities to scramble for dollars .
 
While the county handles nearly 6,000 low-level drug cases a year, the drug court has taken fewer than 100. The money crunch forced the program to stop taking new cases from February until June.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/front/2776007 
 

ARKANSAS NEWS 
 
NOT LOOKING GOOD FOR MARIJUANA AMENDMENT
A proposal to legalize marijuana for medical use does not appear to have enough signatures to get on the Nov. 2 ballot, the general counsel for the secretary of state's office said Thursday.

"It's not looking very good," said Tim Humphries, adding that about half of the signatures on petitions already counted could not be certified as those of registered voters.

"They still need another 23,000 to get on the ballot and there are just about 24,000 (signatures) left to count," Humphries said. "If that verification rate holds it will not get on the ballot. They would have to have a 90 percent verification rate for the rest."
http://www.arkansasnews.com/archive/2004/09/03/News/282910.html  
 

NEWSBRIEF
KENTUCKY BILL WOULD LET FAMILIES COMMIT DRUG USERS TO REHAB
10/17/03
A bill that would allow drug users to be involuntarily committed to drug treatment centers has been introduced in the Kentucky General Assembly. The bill, the "Matthew Casey Wethington Act for Substance Abuse Prevention," would allow family members, friends, or anyone else, for that matter, to petition a Kentucky court seeking the involuntary commitment of a "drug abuser." Wethington was a 22-year-old Morning View man who died of a heroin overdose last year. Under current Kentucky law, no adult can be forced to seek drug treatment. But under the bill pre-filed for the 2004 session by state Rep. Thomas Kerr (R-Taylor Mill), a longtime friend of the Wethington family, that would change, with drug users facing the same sort of involuntary commitment procedures used against mentally ill people who are found to be a danger to themselves or others. Friends or relatives of drug users could petition for a treatment commitment hearing from a district court judge. If, after hearing a doctor's evaluation, the judge deems the person a danger to himself or others, that person could be committed to a treatment center for 60 to 360 days. Failure to comply with a commitment order would be construed as contempt of court, with criminal penalties. "The analogy is a person who suffers from drug abuse really is in the same position as someone with mental health problems. They've lost the ability to make decisions for themselves," Kerr told the Kentucky Post last week. "When you have an individual that's a family member that has drug problems and that person is an adult, under current law there is nothing a family member can do to intervene," Kerr said. Kerr filed a similar bill this year, but it died in part because of budget concerns. Under his original bill, Medicaid would have picked up the tab for treatment costs. In next year's version of the bill, however, the person petitioning for the involuntary commitment would have to pick up the tab. The bill will be considered by the Kentucky General Assembly in its session beginning in January. Visit http://www.lrc.state.ky.us/record/04rs/HB77/bill.doc to read the bill online.

SAMHSA PRESS RELEASE
ADOLESCENT TREATMENT ADMISSIONS INCREASE IN 2002
9/1/2004 Press Release
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
Parklawn Building Rm 12-105
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
www.samhsa.gov

The number of admissions to substance abuse treatment for adolescents ages 12 to 17 increased again in 2002, continuing a ten-year trend. These data were released today in the "Treatment Episode Data Set: National Admissions to Substance Abuse Treatment Services 1992-2002" by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

The new data show that the number of adolescents ages 12 to 17 admitted to substance abuse treatment increased 65 percent between 1992 and 2002. In 1992, adolescents represented 6 percent of all treatment admissions. By 2002, this proportion had grown to 9 percent. This report expands upon data published in May in the "Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) Highlights 2002."

The increase in substance abuse treatment admissions among 12 to 17 year olds was largely due to the increase in the number of admissions in this age group that reported marijuana as their primary drug of abuse. Between 1992 and 2002, the number of adolescent treatment admissions for primary marijuana abuse increased 350 percent. In 1992, 23 percent of all adolescent admissions were for primary marijuana abuse. By 2002, 63 percent of adolescent admissions reported marijuana as their primary drug.

"The youthfulness of people admitted for marijuana use shows that we need to work harder to get the message out that marijuana is a dangerous, addictive substance, SAMHSA Administrator Charles Curie said. All Americans must begin to confront drug use B and drug users B honestly and directly. We must discourage our youngsters from using drugs and provide those in need an opportunity for recovery by encouraging them to enter and remain in drug treatment."

Forty-eight percent of all adolescent treatment admissions in 2002 involved the use of both alcohol and marijuana. Admissions involving these two substances increased by 86 percent between 1992 and 2002.

In 2002, more than half (53 percent) of adolescent admissions were referred to treatment through the criminal justice system. Seventeen percent were self- or individual referrals, and 11 percent were referred through schools.

The TEDS report provides detailed data on admissions to substance abuse treatment for all age groups. The 2002 data show that polydrug abuse (abuse of more than one substance) was more common among TEDS admissions than was the abuse of a single substance. Polydrug abuse was reported by 55 percent of all admissions for substance abuse treatment in 2002. Alcohol, marijuana and cocaine were the most commonly reported secondary substances. For marijuana and cocaine, more admissions reported these as secondary substances than as primary substances.

This new report provides information on the demographic and substance abuse characteristics of the 1.9 million annual admissions to treatment for abuse of alcohol and drugs in facilities that report to individual state administrative data systems. The report also includes data by state and state rates.

The report is available on the web at www.oas.samhsa.gov.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
ANTI-DRUG TESTING BILL THREATENS STUDENTS

Kevin A. Sabet
 Friday, August 20, 2004

If state legislators wrote a bill outlawing a critical remedy to help kids avoid a disease like tuberculosis, there would probably be a major effort
to boot every single one of them out of office. Recently, the state Senate did something just as asinine -- except the condition in question was drug
use by kids, far more prevalent than TB. Bowing to pro-drug interest groups, a bill is making its way to the governor's desk that would stymie
efforts by local schools to test students for drugs. Unlike lawmakers in other states, Sacramento bureaucrats would like to control the way schools drug-test students, making such testing voluntary and placing restrictions on how it is administered.

Drug testing sounds costly, unnecessary, uncompassionate, even unconstitutional. Those who want to legalize and legitimize drug use
caricature drug testing as a draconian policy designed to catch kids using drugs and throw them into jail.

It's time to set the record straight. At a time when drug abuse in California plagues many students, it makes sense to drug-test students as a
part a comprehensive drug-prevention program (which includes after-school programs). Since addiction is spread from peer to peer, drug testing gives a student another more credible reason to say "no" when offered drugs by his or her friend.

Unfortunately, the sponsors of Senate Bill 1386 miss the point of random drug testing when they assume that the practice is unnecessary because it is already easy to detect drug use: "You come into class, your eyes are red, you're falling asleep, and yesterday you weren't like that," argues
Assemblywoman Jackie Goldberg, D-Los Angeles, who coauthored the bill with Sen. John Vasconcellos, D-Santa Clara.

But drug testing is not meant to catch the kid who "everyone knows" is using drugs. The purpose of testing is to get those kids who have yet to
show symptoms of their drug use the help they need before their "recreational fun" turns into dependence or addiction. It's meant to
prevent the scenario described above so that the student and his or her peers don't have to live with the consequences of their classmate coming to school on drugs.

Drug testing is also not intended to detect drug use for punitive purposes -- in fact, the U.S. Supreme Court prohibited that in its recent landmark
ruling defending random drug tests for kids involved in activities at school. No student goes to jail as a result of a positive drug test.
Instead, the family's privacy is respected and the child is referred to get help to stop his or her use. Consequences entail being denied involvement
in sports or other extra curricular activities during the treatment period and until the child tests negative for drugs.

Employing this carrot-and-stick method works. For example: After two years of a drug testing program, Hunterdon Central High School in New Jersey saw significant reductions in 20 of 28 drug use categories, including a drop in cocaine use by seniors from 13 percent to 4 percent. The U.S. military saw drug-use rates drop from 27 percent in 1981 to 3 percent today, thanks to the introduction of random drug testing. Schools like St. Patrick's High in Chicago are seeing a total change in the culture of education at their school as a result of drug testing.

Compared to other health interventions, drug testing is cheap. It costs roughly $10 to $50 per student, per year. Most parents would gladly pay
that small fee in exchange for knowing that their child was safe. In addition, the federal government has proposed $25 million to help school
districts offset the costs.

Unfortunately, opponents of random drug tests (many of whom carry mission statements dedicated to legalizing drugs) can claim some victories in our state. Already, schools such as Bret Harte Union High School in Angels Camp (Calaveras County) have said that they will pull their effective drug testing program if SB1386 passes.

Principals, teachers and parents who employ an effective drug-testing program at school realize it is a valuable tool to deter kids from delving
into drug use in the first place and to refer troubled teens to help. Our elected officials should not make that tool harder to use with this
misguided legislation.

Kevin A. Sabet is the former chief speechwriter for the Bush administration's drug czar. A Marshall scholar at Oxford University, Sabet
and is writing on book on drug use.
 
OPED
THE GOVERNMENT MIGHT BE RIGHT ABOUT MARIJUANA
August 27, 2004
 Kevin A. Sabet
 
The federal government recently announced that the growing potency of  America's most popular illegal drug, marijuana, and the number of kids
seeking help to get off the drug (one in five users) worried them so much that they were soliciting new marijuana-research proposals and urging local law enforcement to crack down on those who sell the drug.
 
The pro-marijuana lobby was furious and immediately charged the feds with fear-mongering and clamoring to protect their (not so glamorous, actually) jobs in Washington. Their cries rested on claims that more potent marijuana is not tantamount to more dangerous marijuana and that the rise in the number of treatment beds for marijuana users is due to criminal justice referrals, not the drug's harmfulness.
 
But the evidence shows the government may indeed have it right. The pro-drug movement, fueled with the motivation to legalize harmful substances and angry at the attack on its values of "drug use for all," is putting kids at risk by downplaying the known dangers of marijuana.
 
Although not as destructive as shooting heroin or smoking crack, marijuana use is unquestionably damaging. Today's more powerful marijuana probably leads to greater health consequences than the marijuana of the 1960s: Astonishingly, pot admissions to emergency rooms now exceed those of heroin. Visits to hospital emergency departments because of marijuana use have risen steadily, from an estimated 16,251 in 1991 to more than 119,472 in 2002. That has accompanied a rise in potency from 3.26 percent to 7.19 percent, according to the Potency Monitoring Project at the University of Mississippi.
 
More potent marijuana is also seen as more lucrative on the market. Customs reports claim that a dealer coming north with a pound of cocaine can make an even trade with a dealer traveling south with a pound of high-potency marijuana. It makes sense that people pay more for stronger pot because the high is better.
 
A flurry of very recent research studies - concerning withdrawal, schizophrenia and lung obstruction, for example - have also shown
marijuana's unfortunate consequences. These conclusions were not being reached in the '70s and '80s (legalizers often point to the
Nixon-commissioned Shafer report, which said nice things about the drug as evidence of marijuana's harmlessness), because marijuana from that era was weaker and less dangerous than today's drug. The May 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that the number of marijuana users over the past 10 years stayed the same while the number dependent on the drug rose 20 percent - from 2.2 million to 3 million.
 
And although a majority of kids in treatment for marijuana are referred there by the criminal justice system, it still remains only a slight
majority - about 54 percent. The rest is self-, school or doctor referral.To paint the picture that the reason marijuana dependence looks higher is
because of the criminal justice system is disingenuous (especially because most people who use only marijuana never interact with law enforcement as a result of that use).
 
Some still argue that it's wrong to arrest kids and force them into treatment. It seems like the government can never win: If it arrests and
locks people up, legalizers kick and scream that we're not giving users "alternatives to incarceration." If it arrest kids as a way to get them
help, and not as a punishment mechanism, all of a sudden the government is giving in to George Orwell.
 
It's too bad that pot apologists don't see what most parents do see: Marijuana is a harmful drug with serious consequences, and mechanisms - even a brush with the law to help a user realize that what he's doing is harmful - to help stop the progression of use should be seen as a good thing. That's not government propaganda. That's common sense.And it may save a few lives.
 
Kevin A. Sabet recently stepped down as senior speechwriter to America's drug czar, John P. Walters. A Marshall Scholar, he is writing a book on drug policy and is also a Ph.D. candidate at Oxford University.
 
 
DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES (DFC) SUPPORT PROGRAM FUNDING INCREASE IN JEOPARDY

Take Action!

 
 
BACKGROUND

The full House Appropriations Committee marked-up its version of the Transportation and Treasury Appropriations bill for FY 2005, which includes funding for the Drug-Free Communities (DFC) program. Unfortunately the Committee only included $70 million for the program, which was last year’s appropriated level. President Bush had requested $80 million for DFC, a $10 million increase over last year. The Senate has not yet acted on this bill. With enough advocacy, the DFC program can receive the President’s Request of $80 million – BUT – we need to flood the House and Senate with letters for this to occur.

The chart below shows the FY 2004 Appropriated level, the President’s FY 2005 Budget Request, the FY 2005 House Mark and the difference between the FY 2004 Appropriated level and House Mark.
Transportation/Treasury Appropriations Bills FY 2004 Appropriated FY 2005 President's Budget Request FY 2005 House Appropriations Committee Mark Difference Between FY 05 President's Request and FY 05 House Appropriations Committee Mark
Drug-Free Communities (DFC) $70 million $80 million*

 
$70 million* $-10 million*


*Includes $1 million for the National Community Anti-Drug Coalition Institute

ISSUE IN BRIEF

Despite the fact that the President requested $80 million for the Drug-Free Communities Act program, the full House Appropriations Committee only included $70 million. I am very concerned that this funding level is insufficient. Please work to ensure that the Drug Free Communities program is fully funded as the appropriations process proceeds.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

It is extremely important that you use CADCA’s CapWiz system to contact your entire congressional delegation NOW: Our sample letter expresses concern that the full House Appropriations Committee did not fully fund DFC at the $80 million level proposed by the President.

YOUR FAX IS CRITICAL.

To send a fax from CADCA’s website directly to your Senators and Representative, click here http://capwiz.com/cadca/home/.

If you would like to personalize your letter with success stories from your community, please email klieupo@cadca.org for a MS Word version of the sample letter.

TIMING

Use CADCA’s CapWiz system to fax your Senators and Representative during the congressional recess, which ends September 7, 2004.

CADCA will keep you fully informed about this issue as the appropriations process moves forward.

625 Slaters Lane, Suite 300**Alexandria, VA 22314**phone: 1-800-54-CADCA**fax: 703-706-0565**www.CADCA.org
 

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